LabVIEW Basics

Hans-Petter Halvorsen

LabVIEW Basics

LabVIEW is a graphical programming language, and it has powerful features for simulation, control and DAQ applicarions.

LabVIEW Basics is a set of Video Tutorials explaining the basic functionality in LabVIEW.

After each Video you will also find small Exercises that you should to in order to practice on the topics explained in the Videos.

1. Installing LabVIEW

Installing LabVIEW is straightforward. But just to be sure, take a look at the Video below before you start downloading and installing LabVIEW. See also the main LabVIEW page.

 

PowerPoint

 

 

2. Getting Started with LabVIEW

LabVIEW programs are called Virtual Instruments, or VIs, because their appearance and operation imitate physical instruments, such as oscilloscopes and multimeters.
In LabVIEW we have 2 different windows; the Front Panel and the Block Diagram. We will introduce the "G" programming Language, LabVIEW IDE, Data Flow Programming, LabVIEW Programming vs. Text-based Programming, Front Panel, Block Diagram, and Wiring in LabVIEW.

This Video gives a short overview of LabVIEW, before you dig into more details in other videos below:

 

PowerPoint

 

Self-paced Course Manual with Exercises

Introduction to LabVIEW (written Tutorial)

 

Video Solutions to Exercises above

Solutions (LabVIEW Code) to most of the Exercises above

 

The Videos below explains each topics (While Loops, Plotting, SubVIs, Formula Nodes, etc.) in the Course Manual in more depth.

 

 

3. While Loops

Loops allow you to repeatedly execute a specific portion of code. The different Loops and Structures available are located in the Structures¬Ě sub palette in the Functions palette on the Block Diagram. The most important loops are For Loops and While Loop.

 

PowerPoint

Exercises

 

 

4. Plotting

LabVIEW has powerful features for plotting your data. You can graphically visualize data in LabVIEW using two basic methods: a waveform chart and waveform graph. This module introduces a waveform graph and a waveform chart and explains when you should use them.

 

PowerPoint

Exercises

 

 

5. SubVIs

SubVIs are VIs within your VI. They increase readability and reusability. SubVIs are like functions or methods used in other programming languages.

 

PowerPoint

Exercises

 

 

6. Case Structures

Case structures are some of the features you probably use most in LabVIEW. It is similar to using "If .. Else .." in text based programming languages.

 

PowerPoint

Exercises

 

 

7. Formula Node

LabVIEW is a graphical programming language, but sometimes it is more convenient to use text-based syntax. We will learn how to do this within the LabVIEW environment using the Formula Node. LaBVIEW also includes also MathScript Node and MATLAB Node. In the  Formula Node we use ordinary C syntax, while in the MathScript Node and MATLAB we use MATLAB syntax.

 

PowerPoint

Exercises

 

8. Arrays

Typically, when dealing with data logging, etc, you need to deal with arrays. LabVIEW has lots of built in functions for manipulating data within arrays.

 

PowerPoint

Exercises

 

9. Clusters

Clusters grouped data elements of mixed types, and handy to use when you want to structure your data into a manageable package. It's similar to struct or record (or a "miniature" class) used in other programming languages.

 

PowerPoint

Exercises

 

 

10. Property Nodes

Property Nodes, Invoke Nodes and References are powerful features in LabVIEW. Lets start with Property Nodes.

 

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11. Project Explorer

The Project Explorer lets you structure all your files that your LabVIEW Application consists of, similar to, e.g., Solution Explorer in Visual Studio. You also need to use the project Explorer if you need to create executable files, or create more advanced applications like Real-Time Applications, etc.

 

PowerPoint

Exercises

 

 

12. Debugging

Debugging is the process of locating and fixing or bugs (errors) in your computer program code, in this case your LabVIEW program. LabVIEW has powerful features for Debugging your Code, such as: Broken Run Arrow, Highlight Execution, Probes and Breakpoints.

 

PowerPoint

 

 

13. DAQ

A DAQ System consists of 4 parts: (1) Physical input/output signals, (2) sensors DAQ device/hardware, (3) Driver software and (4) Your software application (LabVIEW). LabVIEW is well suited for creating DAQ applications and many hardware devices are supported.

Introduction to DAQ in LabVIEW

Go through Videos and Exercises below:

 

Hardware used in the Video: TC-01

 

Self-paced Course Manual with Exercises

 

Introduction to USB-6008 in LabVIEW

Go through Videos and Exercises below:

 

Hardware used in the Video: USB-6008

 

Self-paced Course Manual with Exercises

 

Want to buy your own DAQ device? I recommend myDAQ. myDAQ is a LabVIEW/Visual Studio (DAQmx) compatible DAQ Device, similiar to USB-6008. myDAQ is made for students, so myDAQ can be purchased at a student-friendly price from Studica. Or you could also consider USB-6008 or USB-6001 - buy it, e.g., from ebay.

 

 

You can also see all the LabVIEW Basics Videos on YouTube

Additional Videos

More LabVEW Videos:

LabVIEW Features Videos - A set of Videos explaining all the main Features in LabVIEW - both basic features and more advanced Features like using References, Shift Registers, create and use State Machines, Web Services, etc.

 

LabVIEW Applications Videos - Here we use LabVIEW for real Applications like Data Logging (DAQ), OPC, Hardware in the Loop, Database Systems, Control and Simulations, Model Predictive Control (MPC), etc.

 

LabVIEW Video Collection - Here are a collection of ALL my LabVIEW Videos at YouTube.

LabVIEW Resources

Below you will find more interesting LabVIEW resources


Programming

Programming Resources

LabVIEW

LabVIEW Programming and Training



LabVIEW Videos

LabVIEW Videos withn different Applications and Areas

LabVIEW Tutorials

LabVIEW Tutorials